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January 23, 2013

5

Freed!

by Brendan

I’m now back in the “real” world after my 60-day stint in Florida Recovery Center (“Where miracles happen every day!”).   This is as of last Thursday, 6 days ago.  Settled into the full routine of going to meetings daily (but not 3-4 meetings per day, as is the case in FRC, which also adds other hour-long activities, such as sessions on Meditation, Spirituality, Art Therapy, Music Therapy).  The last four always seemed time-fillers to me, though I enjoyed the Meditation hour since it was so relaxing.

St. Augustine Skyline, including Flagler College, part of the "real" world

St. Augustine Skyline, including Flagler College, part of the “real” world

My Discharge paperwork recommended 90 meetings in 90 days, which fits with my plan, regular work with a sponsor (also my plan, and enjoying working with the redoubtable Steve B); plus private therapy, which I haven’t started yet (maybe so, maybe not), IOP (which stands for Intensive Out Patient program, which I can’t afford at $800 per week), and re-connecting with my primary physician (saw her yesterday).  The Discharge paperwork also said, “Treatment Incomplete due to Financial Concerns.”

Let’s see — uh, “concerns”?  That would seem to imply that I’m “concerned” about the $10,000 per month that FRC costs, and don’t want to pay it.  The actual situation is that There. Is. No. More. Money.

Another reason my treatment is “Incomplete” is that the Florida Recovery Center docs and Treatment Team envision treatment as a 90-day-program, no exceptions.  They have data that they believe shows a better success rate for those who complete 90 days.  What I believe is that the typical patient who does 90 days is a physician or nurse who is released to a 5-year monitoring program — the monitoring, IMHO, likely accounts for the increased success rate, at least as much as the additional 30 days of treatment (which to me was getting a bit repetitive).

Anyway, so far so good — 6 meetings in 6 days, going to a 7th in about an hour, and today is Day 69 of sobriety.

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5 Comments Post a comment
  1. Jan 24 2013

    Didn’t you mean $10,000 a month?

    Reply
    • Jan 24 2013

      Yes, I did mean $10,000, and I just went in and fixed it. Sheesh, $1,000 a month — I wish.

      Thanks so much for being a loyal reader (and a careful reader, too). Let me know if you ever have anything you’d like me to proofread.

      L,

      B

      Reply
  2. Scott Mc Nairy
    Feb 5 2013

    Agree that 5 years of holding a professionals license to practice as “legal hostage” is a core factor in abstinence. But in my experience it’s open season on relapse once the barrier is dropped. Why not make it 10 years? Cruel and unusual punishment ? Yes but the disease of addiction is a life sentence. Pearoles or time off for “good behavior” mean little. IMHO

    Reply
    • Feb 5 2013

      I think that monitoring for professionals is a good idea, but I don’t know enough about the mechanics of it to say whether or not 5 years is enough, or whether or not 10 years is “cruel and unusual punishment.” Knew a lot of docs in treatment but don’t remember anyone saying anything about 5 years or 10 years (or, say, 7 years) of monitoring.

      I’m aware, from meetings, that monitoring being over is, as you say, “open season” on relapse.

      But my point was that the difference in success rates between 60 days of treatment and 90 days of treatment was mostly due to comparing two different groups of people, with the 90-day folks mostly being monitored professionals. And I’m not really aware of how “success” is defined — sober after 2 years, 5 years, or what? (You are likely to know.)

      Thanks for the comments on my blog — it’s a nice thing to have an audience, especially someone who actually discusses the post rather than thos who “like” it (the majority of responses).

      John

      Reply
  3. Scott Mc Nairy
    Feb 5 2013

    Agree that 5 years of holding a professionals license to practice as “legal hostage” is a core factor in abstinence. But in my experience it’s open season on relapse once the barrier is dropped. Why not make it 10 years? Cruel and unusual punishment ? Yes but the disease of addiction is a life sentence. Paroles or time off for “good behavior” mean little. IMHO

    Reply

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